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How was the Oxford Dictionary made? | Brief article on Watt

December 16, 2013

How was the Oxford Dictionary made?

The Oxford dictionary is considered to be a highly standard dictionary for English language. The Oxford dictionary was created by James Augustus Henry Murray of the Scotland. Murray was not a scholar. He studied 8th standard only because his family conditions were not supported him. So he could not continue his studies later. However, he had a talent in remembering of English language words. His talent of remembrance was more than a genius. Murray learned 20 languages at the age of 20th. In his area, nobody was like him. The language learning committee recognized his talent, And they asked him to make a English dictionary.

     In 1857, Murray began to make a dictionary. He thought that the dictionary should be completed in 10 years. But he could not make it in 22 years also. Murray died in 1915 at the age of 78. Until then he expressed in dictionary till "T" letter only. After, with the help of some persons, with 4,14,825 words dictionary was made by the end of 1920. 2,91,000 dollars were spent for this.

About watt:     15V 22V either 2V 220V is written on the electic bulbs. "V" tells the potential of the power. "V" is called as Watt. The "Watt" word is the name of the scientist. He was the James Watt.

     In the green area in Scotland, James Watt was born on January 10, 1730 and died on August 19, 1819.

     Steam engine was one of the machines which were led in the Machinery Industrial Revolution. It was invented by James Watt. His name named to measure of electricity  for his name forever to remain. It was in 1764. After that, he laid further improvement to this, and he got patent in 1769.

 by P.B.

 

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